Porter, Stout and Imperial Stout Beers

Rich, hoppy and offering a surprising amount of variety, stouts and porters are particularly evergreen styles of beer – perfect on their own, during a session or paired with food. Stout beers are richer, stronger and often more bitter than porter beers, which are maltier and span a wider range of flavours.

That said, the two are quite similar and often overlap – check out our range below from breweries including The White Hag, Lervig and Tiny Rebel, sip, see what you think, and contact us if you need any help with your order.

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Stouts and porters have been around for centuries. Porter beers are the older of the two; the dark brews have been around since the early 1700s and their name comes from the fact they were particularly popular with London’s port workers. They were – and still are – robust and warming beers, with big chocolate and coffee aromas and flavours said to give the labourers strength. Stout beers first came about as ‘stout porters’ and were simply more alcoholic versions of porters – back then, you’d just as easily find stout lagers and stout ales in your local. The style crossed the Irish Sea, where the name was shortened to stout, making the distinction between the two tricky. Generally, porters, made from malted barley, have more dark fruit to them, while stouts exhibit big, roasted, bitter characteristics, owing to their use of roasted, but unmalted, barley. Either way, they are both fantastic winter beers or drinks to have with hearty roast dinners and meats. Explore the range above using the search filters to whittle down your selection, and get in touch if you have any questions. Read our features to learn more about beer.